Practicing ProVOCative:

A bold, body-based approach to raising your (actual) voice for justice

 

You’re probably tired of playing nice.

You’re probably aware not everyone’s going to like all the things you want to express in the name of justice

You know speaking up aint always pretty, but how often do you actually practice….with your actual voice?

Time to roll up your sleeves, dive into the muck and ask yourself:

When it’s your moment to speak big truth, will you have the courage?

With a strong, loving container and central focus on embodiment, the dare is on. Through creative partner and group exercises we practice interrupting moments of racism with our voices. We practice staying present with our fear and expanding our capacity for discomfort. We practice fucking up and trying again. We practice calling out and calling in with compassion. We dive into darkness on purpose with the intention of training our hearts and voices to show up proudly for ourselves and our communities. Through this process we gain confidence in speaking up, trust in our voices and shared intimacy with our fellow journeyers.


So You Say You Want To Speak Your Truth

Have you heard? Progressive cultures have a buzz phrase going around:
“Speak your truth!”
Sounds great, right?
But wait…..how often do you actually practice speaking it, in front of other people?
Where does it live in your body? Do you allow it to change?
How often do you adjust your truth based on those around you?
What would it mean to you for the instrument of your body to SOUND your truth and be held by community in doing so?


In this circle participants are guided through somatic meditation, chakra sounding and group vocal exercises designed to get to the heart of their truths and to foster community connection through shared sound.
“What does it mean to be alive, free and connected”?
So much more when we hear what it sounds like.

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Stretch Your Voice, Sister!

Explore your voice and build confidence through playful exercises, chakra sounding, and singing. Attune to your own vibrations and inner-wisdom while connecting with fellow women. The workshop will include guided meditation, intuitive movement, group sounding and harmony. Sing in sisterhood in a way that is supportive, fun, and playful. It’s not about "sounding good"—it’s about being in your body, empowerment, overcoming fears, and expanding your capacity.

 


Sounding the Body Electric: 

Unveiling Vocal Pleasure

Our voices are not just in our throats: they cover our entire bodies. In this playshop participants are guided through a juicy journey of discovering and embodying their unique sounds with themselves and with partners. Through exercises such as chakra sounding, partner toning and role playing participants are supported in tapping into primal energies and giving voice to parts of themselves they may not have even known are there.


Taking Off the Veil

Taking Off the Veil is a workshop for seasoned performers who are looking to take that next step with audience connection and create a lasting impact with their work.

This is about vulnerability as a performer and bringing a lot more of yourself to your creative process, especially the parts you may not want other people to see. Through tapping into the depth, choosing to work with it and letting it be seen, the quality and memorability of your work will greatly amplify.

We look at what audiences remember. We look at what YOU remember from performances you have seen. We look at moments that stand out and what they have in common.

Together we explore:

*What kind of experience do you want your audience to have?

*What are some of the descriptors?

*What, to you, would mark a successful show?

 Photo by Tim Walter

Photo by Tim Walter

“This experience with Kaitlin was very personal and brought life to the learning practice. It made possible what we aim for everyday as teachers; for someone to be completely themselves when learning something new. The students will remember this workshop for a long time, in class and in their every day life.”
— LM, Duke University